Water

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  • Lies My Govt. Told Me About the CA Drought

    WesternWaterBlog
    Editor
    18 Feb 2015 | 11:33 am
    By Katy Grimes  Originally posted on Flashreport While California’s drought conditions are actually historically normal, California’s current drought is being billed by government and media as the driest period in the state’s recorded rainfall history. Scientists who study the Western United States’ long-term climate patterns say California has been dry for significantly longer periods — more than 200 years. However, it only takes reading the weekly California drought water-wise tips in statewide newspapers and local government websites to know the information the…
  • The Stream, March 4: Deforestation Could Cut India Rainfall By One-Fifth

    Circle of Blue WaterNews
    Codi Yeager-Kozacek
    4 Mar 2015 | 9:39 am
    The Global Rundown Scientists linked widespread deforestation to potential drops in monsoon rains across Southeast Asia. California residents backpedaled on water conservation in January, while the state closed 12 oil injection wells this month to prevent groundwater pollution. Israel will increase yearly water supplies to Gaza, the world will meet this month to discuss disaster risk reduction, and the United States will release its study on fracking and drinking water later this spring. A new interactive map tracks environmental protests around the world. “Folks look at their lawns,…
  • Sewage provides insight into human microbiome

    Water - Air Quality / Agriculture News From Medical News Today
    2 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    Microbes in sewage could provide a window into public health without the need for sampling from individualsA new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria...
  • Air pollution linked to slower cognitive development in children

    Water - Air Quality / Agriculture News From Medical News Today
    6 Mar 2015 | 1:00 am
    Higher levels of traffic-related air pollution at schools are linked to slower cognitive development in 7- to 10-year-old children in BarcelonaAttendance at schools exposed to high levels of...
  • The Stream, March 6: Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan Come to Preliminary Agreement on Nile Dam

    Circle of Blue WaterNews
    Kaye LaFond
    6 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    The Global Rundown Residents of Namibia‘s capital are being told to save water amid drought fears, and the Chinese are buying a lot of bottled water because they fear their tap water. Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan have come to a preliminary agreement about operation of the Renaissance Dam on the Nile, and the Achuar tribe of Peru have been awarded a settlement from an oil company that released heavy metals into their corner of the Amazon. Mars used to contain more water than is in the Arctic Ocean. “The level of the three dams supplying the central areas with water are very low,…
 
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    Circle of Blue WaterNews

  • The Stream, March 6: Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan Come to Preliminary Agreement on Nile Dam

    Kaye LaFond
    6 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    The Global Rundown Residents of Namibia‘s capital are being told to save water amid drought fears, and the Chinese are buying a lot of bottled water because they fear their tap water. Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan have come to a preliminary agreement about operation of the Renaissance Dam on the Nile, and the Achuar tribe of Peru have been awarded a settlement from an oil company that released heavy metals into their corner of the Amazon. Mars used to contain more water than is in the Arctic Ocean. “The level of the three dams supplying the central areas with water are very low,…
  • The Stream, March 5: 20-30 Percent of American Shower Water is Spent Waiting for it to Get Hot

    Kaye LaFond
    5 Mar 2015 | 8:58 am
    The Global Rundown A new study says that India, Bangladesh, and China are most at risk due to increased flooding from climate change, while the government of Thailand is testing floating houses to prepare for climate-related flooding. Also in Thailand, the government is offering rice farmers substitute jobs due to extended drought. Hong Kong‘s water rates may double. Finally, the average American wastes 20 percent of their shower water. “It’s better not to fight nature, but to work with nature, and amphibious architecture is one answer.” — Chuta Sinthupan,…
  • The Stream, March 4: Deforestation Could Cut India Rainfall By One-Fifth

    Codi Yeager-Kozacek
    4 Mar 2015 | 9:39 am
    The Global Rundown Scientists linked widespread deforestation to potential drops in monsoon rains across Southeast Asia. California residents backpedaled on water conservation in January, while the state closed 12 oil injection wells this month to prevent groundwater pollution. Israel will increase yearly water supplies to Gaza, the world will meet this month to discuss disaster risk reduction, and the United States will release its study on fracking and drinking water later this spring. A new interactive map tracks environmental protests around the world. “Folks look at their lawns,…
  • United States Clean Water Rule Quandary Begins On Land

    Codi Yeager-Kozacek
    4 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
    EPA’s Clean Water Rule confronts deep-rooted farm resistance. Photo courtesy Ken Sturm / USFWS via Flickr creative commons The EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers say their proposed Clean Water Rule will protect small streams and wetlands that are critical to downstream water quality. By Codi Kozacek Circle of Blue In March 2014, two United States agencies charged with stemming pollution in the nation’s waters proposed a 2-page rule change in federal clean water regulations, a change based on more than 1,000 scientific studies, that was meant to clear up years of legal muddiness in…
  • Infographic: Too Warm to Snow in California, Oregon, and Washington

    Kaye LaFond
    3 Mar 2015 | 11:25 am
    Snowpack in February 2015 was pitifully low in the Cascades and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges. By Kaye LaFond Circle of Blue The Cascades and the Sierra Nevada, two major mountain ranges in the American West, experienced record-high temperatures in February 2015. In most areas, even in the middle of winter, it was too warm to snow. Freezing levels were as much as 1,051 meters (3,448 feet) higher than normal, based on the average from 1980 to 2010. This year’s lack of snowpack — which is below 25 percent of normal in both mountain ranges — means less water than usual will be…
 
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    Water Conserve

  • Yields of key cassava crop not keeping pace with Africa population growth: TRFN

    Reuters: Chris Arsenault
    3 Mar 2015 | 6:21 am
    Reuters: Yields of cassava, a key crop feeding millions of people across Africa, are not keeping pace with population growth despite its tolerance for climate change, a leading scientist said. More than half the world's cassava, a high-energy root crop, is grown in sub-Saharan Africa, where it is often the cheapest source of calories for poor people, said Clair Hershey, programme leader at the Colombia-based International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT). "More than 200 million people rely on...
  • California’s terrifying forecast: In future, it could face droughts nearly every year

    Washington Post: Juliet Eilperin
    3 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Washington Post: Not long ago, scientists at NASA and two major universities warned of an inevitable “megadrought” that will parch the southwestern United States for 35 years, starting around 2050. By then, a new study says, Californians should be fairly accustomed to long, harsh and dry conditions. Over the past 15 years, temperatures have been rising in the Golden State, resulting in annual periods of extreme and blazing heat, while the cycle of low and moderate precipitation cycles have not changed since 1977....
  • Researchers Link Syrian Conflict to a Drought Made Worse by Climate Change

    Washington Post: Juliet Eilperin
    3 Mar 2015 | 2:00 am
    New York Times: Drawing one of the strongest links yet between global warming and human conflict, researchers said Monday that an extreme drought in Syria between 2006 and 2009 was most likely due to climate change, and that the drought was a factor in the violent uprising that began there in 2011. The drought was the worst in the country in modern times, and in a study published Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists laid the blame for it on a century-long trend toward...
  • How Global Warming Helped Cause the Syrian War

    Wired: None Given
    2 Mar 2015 | 9:08 pm
    Wired: The bloody conflict in Syria--which enters its fifth year this month--has killed almost 200,000 people, created 3.2 million refugees, and given rise to the murderous extremist group known as the Islamic State. The roots of the civil war extend deep into Syria’s political and socioeconomic structures. But another cause turns out to be global warming. When violence erupted in Syria during the Arab Spring in 2011, the country had been mired in a three-year drought--its worst in recorded history....
  • Australia on El Nino watch after Pacific Ocean warms

    Washington Post: Juliet Eilperin
    2 Mar 2015 | 8:32 pm
    Reuters: Australia's weather bureau said on Tuesday the chance of an El Nino developing this year had risen to about 50 percent after signs of renewed warming in tropical Pacific Ocean. The Bureau of Meteorology said six out of eight international models it surveyed indicated that sea surface temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean would exceed El Nino thresholds by mid-year. El Nino can prompt drought in Southeast Asia and Australia and heavy rains in South America, hitting production of food such as...
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    Water News -- ScienceDaily

  • Novel mechanism to explain high elevation of Denver area

    6 Mar 2015 | 7:27 am
    Researchers have proposed a new way to explain how the High Plains got so high. Water trapped deep below Earth's crust may have flooded the lower crust, creating buoyancy and lift.
  • Researchers create artificial methane hydrates, open an innovative pathway for use of new fuels

    6 Mar 2015 | 4:38 am
    A technology that allows the preparation of artificial methane hydrates has been developed by researchers. These researchers have demonstrated that it is possible to prepare methane hydrates in a laboratory by imitating, and even enhancing, natural processes through the use of activated carbon materials as nano-reactors. One of the keys of this research was that scientists were able to reduce the process to form methane hydrates, which takes a long time in nature, to just a few minutes, thus making its technological applicability much easier.
  • Snffing out origins of methane: instrument identifies methane's origins in mines, deep-sea vents, and cows

    5 Mar 2015 | 12:21 pm
    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide in its capacity to trap heat in Earth's atmosphere for a long time. The gas can originate from lakes and swamps, natural-gas pipelines, deep-sea vents, and livestock. Understanding the sources of methane, and how the gas is formed, could give scientists a better understanding of its role in warming the planet.
  • Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find

    5 Mar 2015 | 12:21 pm
    An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. Ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life.
  • The tides they are a changin'

    5 Mar 2015 | 5:13 am
    Scientists have found that ocean tides have changed significantly over the last century at many coastal locations around the world. Increases in high tide levels and the tidal range were found to have been similar to increases in average sea level at several locations.
 
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    AWRA Water Blog

  • TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 21 – 27 February 2015

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    27 Feb 2015 | 7:57 am
    Almost out of February! Interesting when you learn that short pieces you and six other experts wrote in May 2009 years ago are once again seeing the light of day. And with a nifty graphic, too! I even had a few more strands of hair! Check out the weekly water news summary – click here. “Don’t you […] Related posts: TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 14 – 20 February 2015 Here is the weekly water news – click here. Seems... TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 7 – 13 February 2015 It’s not a good day for those who suffer…
  • JAWRA Seeks Associate Editor, Surface Water Hydrology

    cmccrehin
    26 Feb 2015 | 8:24 am
    The Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) is seeking a new associate editor (AE) in surface water hydrology. The person in this position will evaluate journal article manuscripts about processes and interactions controlling surface water hydrology and about prediction of surface water hydrology. Surface water hydrology manuscripts submitted to JAWRA span a wide […] Related posts: Wigington Selected JAWRA Editor-in-Chief, Will Assume Roll in 2015 Jim Wigington was recently chosen by a selection committee and... Position Open: JAWRA Editor-in-Chief We here…
  • Clean Water Act & Wetlands: ‘Preservation Is a Flawed Mitigation Strategy’

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    21 Feb 2015 | 11:54 am
    Jessica Owley, an Associate Professor at SUNY Buffalo Law School, penned this article, ‘Preservation is a Flawed Mitigation Strategy’, published in Ecology Law Currents last month. Good article. Can you spell ‘L-A-N-D  T-R-U-S-T-S’? Download Preservation-is-a-flawed-mitigation-strategy   Introduction The objective of the Clean Water Act is to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters. To help achieve that […] Related posts: Congress Navigates the Clean Water Act: Is Water Wet? So will Congress…
  • TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 14 – 20 February 2015

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    20 Feb 2015 | 9:09 am
    Here is the weekly water news – click here. Seems to be cold weather almost everywhere in eastern North America. Here is a picture of the Canadian Niagara Falls. Not frozen solid but pretty close. Can’t pass this one up – HRH Bonnie Prince Charlie visits the ‘Cathedral of Sewage’ to celebrate 150 years of London’s sewers. Good […] Related posts: TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 31 January – 6 February 2015 Several weeks ago I never figured that the next ‘hot... TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 7 – 13 February 2015 It’s not a…
  • Why Interdisciplinary Academic Programs Don’t Work The Way They Should

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:59 am
    Some of us had a meeting yesterday in which the new Marine Studies Initiative was discussed. The MSI is a proposed interdisciplinary (ID) program here at Oregon State University. As usual, some in the group commented on how tough it is to maintain ID programs, that the academic landscape is littered with failed ID programs, blah, blah, […] No related posts.
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    We All Live Downstream

  • The Horrors of Sulfur Dioxide

    admin
    5 Mar 2015 | 1:48 pm
    By Denny Green, Michigan Communications Coordinator – Follow our Michigan Team on Twitter (@CleanWaterMI) I imagine that reading about “Sulfur Dioxide” may, at first, sound about as interesting as reading through your old high school science homework, and nowhere nearly as interesting as say, a good Stephen King thriller.  But what if I told you that Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) was even scarier than the books in your typical Horror section . . . and posed a far more realistic threat than vampires and haunted cars? Exposure to SO2—in even just a few minutes—can have significant impacts…
  • Working Together for Change

    admin
    5 Mar 2015 | 1:32 pm
    By Paula W, Pittsburgh Phone Organizer Working as a political canvasser can be frustrating. Especially when certain politicians seem more intent on digging in, maintaining the status quo, and working for a very small set of special interests. But we can change that – when we partner together. Most of us who work to protect our environment care deeply about the issues we are working on. It’s certainly not the money that is the payoff – it’s the people. Working at Clean Water affirms the importance of a shared belief or vision: creating a better environment for all of…
  • Oil and Gas Industry Influence: It’s not just the Drinking Water Study!

    admin
    2 Mar 2015 | 2:46 pm
    By John Noël, National Oil and Gas Campaigns Coordinator – Follow John on Twitter (@Noel_Johnny) Today Inside Climate News and Desmogblog published unsettling details on the oversized influence of the natural gas industry over EPA’s long awaited Study of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas and Its Potential Impact on Drinking Water Resources. Thousands of documents made possible by a Greenpeace Freedom of Information Act request detail just how lopsided the relationship was between companies, namely Chesapeake Energy and Range Resources and the EPA – specifically when trying to…
  • On the Right Side of History with a Commonsense Veto of the Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

    admin
    24 Feb 2015 | 12:53 pm
    By John Noel, National Oil and Gas Campaign Coordinator – Follow John on Twitter (@Noel_Johnny) Today we are thrilled to hear the President vetoed S.1, a bill which would approve the Keystone Pipeline and put millions at risk of groundwater contamination while significantly increasing carbon pollution from the dirtiest oil on the planet. The risk of spills from the pipeline are  put squarely on the backs of landowners, farmers and Native American communities in the pipelines path, while the benefits of the project are concentrated to a few in the fossil fuel industry. Clean Water…
  • Hit ‘em where it hurts…The Bottom Dollar

    admin
    20 Feb 2015 | 9:43 am
    By Will Fadely, Baltimore Program Organizer – Follow Will on Twitter (@TrillChillWill ) Since Energy Answer’s entrance into Baltimore in 2008, we have been organizing with numerous groups like Chesapeake Climate Action Network (CCAN), Sierra Club, Institute for Local Self Reliance (ILSR), Community Research, Environmental Integrity Project (EIP) and others in order to fight the proposed Energy Answers Incinerator. Especially instrumental was Free Your Voice a group of local students assisted by United Workers. The campaign has focused on encouraging groups contracted to receive energy…
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    WesternWaterBlog

  • Lies My Govt. Told Me About the CA Drought

    Editor
    18 Feb 2015 | 11:33 am
    By Katy Grimes  Originally posted on Flashreport While California’s drought conditions are actually historically normal, California’s current drought is being billed by government and media as the driest period in the state’s recorded rainfall history. Scientists who study the Western United States’ long-term climate patterns say California has been dry for significantly longer periods — more than 200 years. However, it only takes reading the weekly California drought water-wise tips in statewide newspapers and local government websites to know the information the…
  • State Stops Water in Area of Central Valley—Files Lawsuit for Government Made Disaster

    Editor
    30 Oct 2014 | 11:03 am
    By Stephen Frank  Between the Feds and the State Water Project, farmers in the Friant area of the Central Valley got NO water this past year. “. Instead, the Exchange Contractors were supplied much of the summer with water released from Friant Dam, a major cause of the Friant Division’s first-ever Zero allocation of CVP water. Friant’s petition takes issue with the State Board’s failure to honor water right seniority and imposition of “health and safety” use limitations on the Reclamation’s Delta water exports. The Congressionally authorized purposes of the Central Valley…
  • WATER WAR ON HORIZON

    Editor
    23 Apr 2014 | 10:26 am
    State threatens to cut off SSJID water to protect fish By Jason Campbell A water war is about to erupt on the Stanislaus River. It’s all because the State of California — which may stop all diversions from the Stanislaus River starting June 5 to protect fish — has told the South San Joaquin Irrigation District that it may overrule historic water rights. If that were to happen it means Ripon, Escalon and Manteca farmers would run out of irrigation water by mid-August.   The cities of Manteca, Lathrop, and Tracy may no longer have any surface water by then as well. But the SSJID is…
  • State drought policies just don’t hold water

    Editor
    28 Mar 2014 | 8:15 am
    Posted by Katy Grimes at the Flashreport  Part l of two stories about the reality of California’s water supply Whether or not California’s drought conditions are brought on by alleged “global warming,” most agree the state is lacking rainfall. What many in the state refuse to acknowledge is that this is actually typical; drought occurs 40 percent of the time in California. It’s not unusual. However, government and public officials with an agenda of opportunistic control are fueling the melodramatic media coverage of the state’s rainfall shortage. And many of…
  • Claremont should be wary of water takeover plan

    Editor
    6 Mar 2014 | 1:09 pm
    By Jon Coupal His column in the Inland Valley Dailey Bulletin As most Californians are aware, the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association has been defending homeowners’ rights for more than 35 years. Attacks on property rights come in many forms — from excessive property taxes to overregulation and ballooning costs for sewer, water and refuse collection. A particularly dangerous movement has taken hold in California that constitutes an immediate threat to homeowners in Claremont. The city government is planning to use eminent domain to seize the local water system currently owned and operated…
 
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    Akvo.org » Blog

  • Dots in the Pacific

    Aulia Rahman
    11 Feb 2015 | 6:48 pm
    Above: Port Vila, Vanuatu, seen from the World War II memorial which overlooks the town.I had heard of Vanuatu before. I think it was in 2006 when I was still working in my previous organisation. We had a project building government capacity for climate change negotiation in three countries – Nepal, Fiji, and Indonesia. Fiji was classified as one of 20 Small Island Developing States (SIDS) dotted around the South Pacific. Vanuatu was another, and that’s where I heard of it for the first time, though I never thought I would get the chance to step foot on it almost eight years…
  • The new RSR is almost here

    Adrian Collier
    30 Jan 2015 | 4:46 am
    For the past seven years we’ve been working with hundreds of international organisations to bring projects online with Akvo RSR in order to provide a consistent and consumable format for activities to be presented to the world.One of the most powerful features of Akvo RSR – as it stands today – is that it brings a voice to people working in the field via RSR updates. With the introduction of RSR Up early in 2014, this was brought to Android devices. We’ve seen first hand the impact this can have for internal communication to increase visibility for projects as things…
  • Exploring the potential for a water point data standard

    Henry Jewell
    30 Jan 2015 | 2:24 am
    Exploring the potential for a water point data standardSince the first instance when US NGO Water For People introduced FLOW in 2010, we’ve gained huge experience in mobile surveys of point data. Akvo FLOW has now been used to monitor or evaluate around a million data points, many of these being water points.One of our key goals is to enable better programmatic and policy decision making in the development sector, based on high quality real-time data. In the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene sector (often termed “WASH”), we’ve focused on helping organizations and…
  • Toilets for sale – changing sanitation mindsets in Indonesia

    Aulia Rahman
    29 Jan 2015 | 1:41 am
    We walk through a small and hazy alley to get to the kitchen. The lady who has invited us for lunch is frying something. It smells nice. Suddenly a young girl appears from behind a curtain, which acts as the door to the toilet, based in the same room. The odour from inside mixes with the flavours in the kitchen. The little girl, the first daughter in the family, joins her mother to prepare fried banana for us. She does not wash her hands. As Indonesians and guests of the family, we cannot refuse the treat that is presented to us. It tastes good, but I can’t stop thinking about the toilet…
  • Now’s the time to adopt IATI

    Jo Pratt
    28 Jan 2015 | 9:25 am
    There is little doubt that the reporting standard developed by the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) is heading for the mainstream across the international development sector. Funders and donor agencies are increasingly requiring implementing organisations to report their activities via the IATI standard – no IATI, no money. Most grants from the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) for example, require NGOs to publish to IATI as part of their grant compliance. The Dutch Ministry for Foreign Affairs (DGIS) is now making the same stipulation. This…
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    Aguanomics

  • Speed blogging

    6 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    Here's an article on irrigation, the environment and fisheries in California (I'm quoted)Bio-toilets are a useful solution for communities lacking infrastructure (or competent sanitation authorities) Increasing block rates are "under attack" in California from water hogs facing steep charges (in excess of "fair" costs). I've argued against them as over-complex, inaccurate and fiscally destabilizing attempts at social engineering. Maybe this is a useful lawsuit? Israel and Jordan -- with US money -- agree on a project that will neither protect the Dead Sea nor change unsustainable water use…
  • Anything but water

    5 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    Banksy goes to Palestine... and does not enjoy itWhat's the difference between (North) Americans and the Dutch? The Dutch celebrate "warm sweater day" as a way of saving energy (google translate is messy)Speed cameras in New York raised lots of money, but they also reduced accidents and injuries. The Swedes have taken speed cameras a step further by distributing fines from speeding drivers to drivers respecting the limits. Awesome Congress is looking into the funding sources of climate skeptics. Coyote thinks this is a witchhunt, but I disagree: we know that fossil fuel companies have a lot…
  • The tyranny of false choices

    4 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    How do you get a misleading headline like this: "Field Poll: More Californians want mandatory water rationing"?Start with a flawed poll that asks: Governor Brown and most major water providers in the state are calling for Californians to voluntarily cut back the amount of water they use by 20%. Others are calling for mandatory water rationing with fines or steep penalties for those who do not conserve. Which policy do you favor the state and other major water providers to be taking at this time – voluntary cutbacks or mandatory water rationing?People asked this question favored voluntary…
  • Speed blogging

    3 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    I'm on EconTalk this week... talking about water :)Alberto Garrido is giving a webinar on "Water Challenges in the Agricultural Sector" this Friday. Before you listen, read Gomez and Perez's paper on the paradox of individual irrigation conservation leading to greater total consumptionI've got short bit on Marketplace but say more on a separate, two minute clip on underpriced water (and under-maintained infrastructure)Emily Green points out the dangers of replacing trees with rocks, i.e., not much water savings for a big loss in neighborhood valuesChinese farmers are paying more for…
  • Monday funnies

    2 Mar 2015 | 10:00 am
    Cartoon Mick sent this over:
 
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    WordPress Tag: Water

  • in this world, i can breathe #34 Color Sketches (Series 4)

    jillbware
    6 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
  • Texas study says urban growth exposing world's cities to high flood and drought risk

    rosslynbeeby
    6 Mar 2015 | 2:37 am
    Many of the world’s cities face increased risk of floods and drought, even without factoring in likely impacts of climate change, according to new research. A study by geographers at Texas A&M University estimates the global area of urban land exposed to floods and drought will “at least double” by 2030, with coastal “megacities” in Asia and Africa being most affected. It’s published in the journal Global Environmental Change , and is the first global forecast of how urban expansion will increase exposure to natural hazards. In China, urban growth in low lying, flood-prone…
  • New on 500px : House by the pond by DomiKetu

    Chae H. Bae
    6 Mar 2015 | 2:21 am
    via 500px http://ift.tt/1wLnOLK
  • House by the pond by DomiKetu

    Biken Shrestha
    6 Mar 2015 | 2:16 am
    Photo Credit : DomiKetu
  • A note to those who always say no

    mjmsennelager1965
    6 Mar 2015 | 2:09 am
    A note to those who always say no Cataracts and tears, fountains and weirs, if they froze would not be, if they chose to be crystal. And the sea, lake and river, whether salt, brackish, clear, must be water ever, running far, falling near. If the freshet would harden or the blood turn to amber, the brook could not gladden the eye of the traveller.
 
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    Chance of Rain

  • “After the Lawn” Part 3: Turf dormancy

    EmilyGreen
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:58 pm
    Allowing lawn to go seasonally brown is a smart way to save water and divert irrigation to high-value trees.
  • Bob, Ted, Leavenworth and Bavaria

    EmilyGreen
    25 Feb 2015 | 1:56 pm
    Ted Price, one of the two gay World War II veterans who transformed Leavenworth, WA into a slice of Bavaria, died this week in Vancouver.
  • “After the Lawn” Part 2: Draw before you dig

    EmilyGreen
    24 Feb 2015 | 6:22 pm
    The second in a 12-part series from KCET urges those considering landscaping rebates to draw their lots to find the right spot to begin turf removal.
  • ‘After the lawn’ launches at KCET

    EmilyGreen
    20 Feb 2015 | 9:58 pm
    Southern California is undergoing a landscape revolution. KCET has launched a new series aimed at helping a water-strapped region save its trees while reducing its lawns.
  • Rain barrels: fad or fix?

    EmilyGreen
    13 Jan 2015 | 3:03 pm
    Are rain barrels a fad with all the charm of a placing trash can in front of the house? Or can they be a valuable conservation tool in dry Southern California?
 
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    Waiology

  • New Zealand captures over 10% of its freshwater resource

    Waiology
    11 Feb 2015 | 9:28 pm
    By Daniel Collins Following a recent Timaru Herald article (3 February, 2015), I learned of a claim that 98% of NZ’s rainfall is left to flow out to sea, and that we only capture the other 2%. ‘‘This country doesn’t have a water shortage issue. What it has is a water storage issue. We capture a mere 2 per cent of our country’s total rainfall, the rest pours out to sea!’’ – Waitaki MP Jacqui Dean’s office. ‘‘It is wasteful that we only capture around 2 per cent of rainfall in New Zealand, with the rest roaring out to sea.’’ – Minister for Primary Industries Nathan…
  • The natural history of New Zealand’s freshwaters: Series conclusion and reader feedback

    Waiology
    8 Dec 2014 | 12:20 pm
    By Daniel Collins Over the past two months, Waiology’s Freshwater in Focus series on natural history has published 14 articles, from 13 authors and seven institutions, describing the diversity, complexity, and beauty of New Zealand’s freshwaters. From atmosphere to lithosphere and mountain to coast, we have seen examples of how water shapes the landscapes and ecosystems, and what traits plants and animals have acquired to thrive and survive in these environments. The articles highlight the wonder of the natural world – whether for curiosity’s sake or to better under our natural…
  • The secret lives of freshwater mussels

    Waiology
    4 Dec 2014 | 1:37 pm
    By Kevin J Collier and Sue Clearwater You may not see them, but they are probably out there somewhere…hiding under overhangs and around fallen branches out of the main flow along stream banks, or buried in soft sediments on lake bottoms with only their siphons showing. And where you find one freshwater mussel there are likely to be more, sometimes many more. Part of a bed of freshwater mussels quietly doing their thing 24/7. The inhalant siphon is fringed with tentacle-like sensory cilia and will occasionally “cough out” clumps of pseudo-faeces comprised of particles that have been…
  • Food webs: Who eats who, and what does that tell us?

    Waiology
    1 Dec 2014 | 1:00 pm
    By Elizabeth Graham Food webs are maps of “who eats who” within an ecosystem (Figure 1a). Each node, or point, in the web represents a species or group of organisms; nodes are connected by a link if there is a known feeding relationship between the two groups. Though they are built on simple predator-prey relationships, food webs integrate complex information about biotic communities and key ecosystem processes, such as energy and nutrient flow, and are increasingly being used to study both biodiversity and function of freshwater ecosystems. Stream food web (a) before and (b) after trout…
  • Lamprey – Living fossils in our midst

    Waiology
    19 Nov 2014 | 11:00 am
    By Cindy Baker Lamprey and hagfish (known as cyclostomes or agnathans) are the only living jawless vertebrates. Over 360 million years old, lampreys swam past herds of drinking dinosaurs, and have survived at least four mass extinctions. The brain of the lamprey is believed to be the closest example of our primal vertebrate ancestors, and lampreys provide important insight into the evolution of fins, jaws and the skeleton, plus vertebrate motor control, and immunology. The oral ‘sucker’ that lamprey use to attach to objects and fish.Lamprey have evolved to utilise the same lifestyle as…
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    Watery Foundation »

  • Water Management District Review Commission, 1995

    Tom
    4 Mar 2015 | 2:52 pm
    Oh, the hell with Florida water study commissions from 60 years ago! We got nothin’ to learn from ancient history like that! And we don’t care either if the Water Management District Review Commission only 20 years ago had 80 detailed recommendations, most of which were implemented by the Legislature or the WMDs. All that matters is now, now, now. And it is so risky to ask for independent advice. You might not like the result!
  • March 1, 1955

    Tom
    1 Mar 2015 | 11:07 am
    After a series of meetings around the state, the “Citizens Water Problem Study Committee” delivered their report to Governor Leroy Collins on March 1, 1955.  Sixty years ago, their primary “question was “the need for a water law in Florida.” (p. 1) They decided that a full “Water Resources Study Commission” was needed “for the ultimate purpose of recommending water resource legislation, if needed, at the 1957 session of the Legislature.” (p. 24)  The 1955 Legislature accepted the recommendation and set up the Study Commission, which…
  • Everglades practice

    Tom
    25 Feb 2015 | 2:21 pm
    The “Cultural Cognition Project” led by Dan Kahan addresses “how cultural values shape public risk perceptions and related policy beliefs.” He has a lengthy new paper on how people navigate the connection between what science says about climate change and their membership in particular cultural groups. Kahan points to the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact as a rare example of a diverse group that sidesteps the usual “polarizing cultural status competition” on belief in climate change. The paper argues that, …. it is perfectly…
  • Demanding to be first in the water line

    Tom
    22 Feb 2015 | 3:25 pm
    I was asked to write a bit more about how the House water bill gives “Special water breaks” to certain water “self-suppliers.” The details are buried deep within the 87-page bill and  are designed almost entirely to benefit agricultural users (without saying so). How do these special favors for agriculture work? A key example is a revolution in the statute’s definition of “water resource development.” It adds “self-suppliers” to those eligible for government assistance: (24) “Water resource development” means the…
  • Moral licensing; policy change

    Tom
    18 Feb 2015 | 3:33 pm
    A water conservation campaign in Boston gave residents weekly feedback on water use. Researchers, in comparing those water users with a control group, found that residents with the water conservation tips reduced their water use. Yay!!! Now the not-so-good part: this group of water conservers simultaneously increased their energy use. Moral licensing was at work. That is when “people can call to mind previous instances of their own socially desirable or morally laudable behaviors,’ making them ‘more comfortable taking actions that could be seen as socially undesirable or…
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    Dales Water Services Ltd

  • Help With Private Water Supplies Event in Thirsk on March 16th 2015

    Jonny
    3 Mar 2015 | 2:53 am
    Dales Water will be attending a special ‘Help with Private Water Supplies’ seminar at the Thirsk Rural Business Centre at the town’s Auction Mart, from 10am – 4pm on Monday 16th of March 2015. The event is free and it has been put together to offer advice to people who get their water supply from a spring, stream, well or a borehole. Business owners, a domestic users, landlords and landowners etc. are all invited to come along. There will be lots on offer including an overview of the Private Water Supplies Regulations 2009 and the rules / implications surrounding them. Plus…
  • High Specification Boreholes

    Jonny
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:39 am
    In certain industries a higher specification borehole installation maybe required to ensure a business can operate successfully and profitably. This can be for a number of reasons such as the need to comply with government regulations, to ensure that final product (of which water helped produce) meets the required quality standards, the need to reduce operating costs when margins get squeezed by mains water bills or simply because the client wants the highest specification borehole possible. What is a High Specification Borehole? The best way to explain a higher specification borehole is to…
  • Dales Water Provide Rapid Turnaround Service to Borehole Water Dependent Site

    Jonny
    27 Jan 2015 | 6:03 am
    Over the Christmas period our maintenance team responded to an emergency call out from a site in the North of England. The entire water supply had failed meaning no water was being delivered from the borehole. The site in question runs entirely on a private water supply and should they have to switch onto a mains supply due to failure it becomes expensive and inadequate. Luckily our maintenance team were on hand to help; responding quickly to the call out, diagnosing the issue, sourcing the replacement pumps and implementing the fix in under 24 hours. This allowed the site to become fully…
  • The Importance of Personal Protective Equipment in Borehole Drilling

    Jonny
    15 Jan 2015 | 8:20 am
    Health and safety plays a big part in the way we do things at Dales Water and one area we pay a lot of attention to is the protective equipment worn and used by our staff working on drilling sites throughout the UK. A number of our recent projects have required specialist PPE due to working with harsh chemicals (see our post on borehole acidisation) and on a number of sites we work on have bespoke PPE requirements. Choosing the Right Type of PPE PPE is usually the last line of protection for our workers against hazards and the PPE chosen will depend on the work environment, the work…
  • New Staff Member Announcement + Christmas Hours 2014

    Jonny
    16 Dec 2014 | 5:06 am
    We’re delighted to announce the appointment of a new Administration Assistant, Karen Ellis, who will be based at our recently refurbished Melmerby Head Office full time. Karen has a background working in Human Resources and in her new role she will primarily be helping the management team, dealing with telephone calls, customer queries and liaising with existing customers. The appointment comes as part of continued expansion and we’re thrilled to welcome Karen on-board at Dales Water. Christmas and New Year Opening Hours 2014 This year our head office officially closes on Monday 22nd…
 
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