Water

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  • Dear UN: we’re all a part of the data revolution. #akvo

    Akvo.org » Blog
    Stefan Kraus
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:56 am
    In August, the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon established an “Independent Expert Advisory Group” to provide advice on a “data revolution for sustainable development”, as part of the post-2015 development agenda process. Post-2015 is United Nations-speak for “What comes after the Millennium Development Goals?” aka the MDGs; this set of 15-year global targets related to poverty reduction and international development. They run out in 2015, so what comes next occupies much debate around the UN and the organisations that work to influence it.The…
  • Joshua Newton's Water Jobs and More! - 29 October 2014

    WaterWired
    Aquadoc
    29 Oct 2014 | 10:18 am
    Josh is back with more jobs and stuff! I knew he would come through on National Cat Day! The pictured feline is my Galahad (aka G-had), seeking breakfast, not a job. These posts are archived here. 1) Senior WASH Consultant - UNICEF (New York): Download Senior_WASH_Consultant_TOR 2) Consultant: Environnemental &...
  • Happy Birthday to the Clean Water Act

    We All Live Downstream
    jscott@cleanwater.org
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:59 am
    by Bob Wendelgass, Clean Water Action President & CEO, follow on Twitter @BWendelgass The Clean Water Act turns forty-two this weekend! When Congress overwhelmingly passed the landmark Clean Water Act in 1972, we set an incredibly ambitious goal: eliminate all water pollution. Before the Act, the Cuyahoga River caught fire, Lake Erie was declared “dead,” untreated waste was routinely dumped in rivers and streams, and wetlands were thought to be useless swamps that needed to be drained for development or agriculture. The Clean Water Act changed all of that. Over the past…
  • Political Dimensions of Iran’s Water Crisis

    WaterSISWEB | Published News
    misspersian
    28 Oct 2014 | 11:48 am
    This is a political crisis, not only because Iran’s shrinking water resources have given rise to protests, but also because Iran’s nationalistic pursuit of development has itself been a primary driver of the water crisis. Iran’s post-revolutionary economic development policies have been formed in international isolation, removed from the global market, knowledge pool, and technological advances. Iran’s revolutionary mantle of ‘Neither West nor East’ has led successive governments to frame economic policies in the context of independence from global political and economic…
  • Drones help show how environmental changes affect the spread of infectious diseases

    Water - Air Quality / Agriculture News From Medical News Today
    26 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, can collect detailed information in real time at relatively low cost for ecological research.
 
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    Circle of Blue WaterNews

  • Earth’s Major Aquifers Are in Trouble

    Brett Walton
    30 Oct 2014 | 10:19 am
    Groundwater reserves are falling, but little is known about how much water is left. Image courtesy of J. S. Famiglietti, The Global Groundwater Crisis, Nature Climate Change, November, 2014 Water reserves are falling in several of the world’s major aquifers in Earth’s arid and semi-arid mid-latitudes. The graph shows declines in water storage translated into a decrease in water levels, measured in millimeters. The data is derived from the NASA GRACE satellite mission. The storage changes are shown month-by-month for the period April 2002–May 2013, with 24-month smoothing, a statistical…
  • The Stream, October 30: U.S. Losing Trillions of Gallons of Water to Aging Infrastructure

    Codi Yeager-Kozacek
    30 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    The Global Rundown Aging infrastructure is wasting huge amounts of water in the United States, where San Antonio is eying a major water pipeline deal. A new report values water infrastructure in New Zealand. Also Down Under: threats to Sydney’s drinking water and plans to dump dredged soil onto Australia’s wetlands. Heavy rains threaten life and livelihoods in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. The drought in Brazil pushes up soybean prices, and salt damage destroys farmland in arid regions around the globe. “The Abbott and Newman governments realized that the community was not going…
  • San Antonio Pipeline Continues Texas Water Rush

    Brett Walton
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:24 pm
    America’s seventh-largest city debates a pipeline project worth billions as the second-fastest-growing state faces more demands for water in its third year of severe drought. Photo courtesy of pisaphotography via Shutterstock The seventh-largest city in the United States, San Antonio, is considering a $US 3.4 billion contract to increase its water supply by 20 percent. Click image to enlarge. By Brett Walton Circle of Blue A champion of municipal water conservation in the United States is about to open its wallet for an expensive pipeline to increase its supply. The San Antonio City Council…
  • The Stream, October 30: Looking Back at 42 Years of the Clean Water Act

    Kaye LaFond
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:23 am
    Science North America, South America A new report from Environment America details successes of the Clean Water Act passed in the United States 42 years ago. 15 rivers, lakes and bays are highlighted. Notably, the Cuyahoga River, which once was so polluted that it actually caught fire, now supports a healthy fishery. Researchers from Chile and the University of California-Berkeley have published a study showing a link between arsenic in drinking water and decreased rates of breast cancer. Chilean women exposed to naturally occurring arsenic in their drinking water had their chances of a…
  • Hawaii River Restorations Reflect National Desire to Protect Water for Public Benefit

    Codi Yeager-Kozacek
    28 Oct 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Using public trust doctrine, communities restore streams diverted for more than 100 years. Photo courtesy Jan Arendtsz via Flickr Creative Commons Water restored to natural rivers will help support fields of Hawaii’s traditional and culturally important taro crop, like these on the island of Kauai.Click image to enlarge. By Codi Kozacek Circle of Blue Streams that have been drained dry for more than a century flowed again on the Hawaiian island of Maui last week following the return of water diverted to supply sugar plantations in the island’s arid central plains. The restorations are…
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    U.S. EPA Water News

  • EPA Announces Removal of Two Toxic Hotspots on Lake Superior and Lake Michigan from Binational List

    30 Oct 2014 | 9:18 am
    CHICAGO – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced that two U.S. Areas of Concern, Deer Lake in the Lake Superior basin and White Lake in the Lake Michigan basin, have been removed from the binational list of toxic hotspots that were targeted for cleanup in the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. After decades during which only one U.S
  • Another Successful Year of Hudson River Cleanup Draws to a Close; One More Year of Dredging Expected

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:52 am
    (New York, NY) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that next week the Hudson River dredging will conclude for the year. Dredging is expected to continue in spring 2015. To date, about 2.5 million cubic yards of sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been removed. In 2014 approximately 575,000 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated sediment were dredged from the bottom of the river, exceeding the annual goal of 350,000 cubic yards
  • EPA Announces Removal of Two Toxic Hotspots on Lake Superior and Lake Michigan from Binational List

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:16 am
    CHICAGO – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced that two U.S. Areas of Concern, Deer Lake in the Lake Superior basin and White Lake in the Lake Michigan basin, have been removed from the binational list of toxic hotspots that were targeted for cleanup in the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. After decades during which only one U.S
  • EPA Inspection Reveals Clean Water Act Violations by Winifred Feed Lot, LLC, near Frankfort, Kansas

    29 Oct 2014 | 1:58 pm
    Environmental News FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (Lenexa, Kan., Oct. 29, 2014) – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency personnel conducted inspections in northeastern Kansas in December 2013. As a result of one of the inspections, the owner of a beef feedlot, Winifred Feed Lot, LLC, has agreed to pay a $16,150 civil penalty to settle alleged violations of the Clean Water Act (CWA), according to a proposed consent agreement
  • Texas Company to Pay $1.6M for Oil Spill Violations

    29 Oct 2014 | 11:52 am
    DALLAS – (Oct. 29, 2014) Superior Crude Gathering Inc. (Superior Crude) has agreed to pay a civil penalty for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act stemming from a 2010 crude oil spill from tanks at Superior’s oil storage facility in Ingleside, Texas, the Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today. Under the consent decree lodged today in federal court, Superior will pay $1.61 million to resolve the government’s claims
 
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    Water Conserve

  • Even Worldwide Pandemic Can’t Cull Unsustainable Human Population

    Nature World: None Given
    28 Oct 2014 | 3:06 pm
    Nature World: Environmental scientists for the most part agree that the human population is growing at an unsustainable rate, to the point that even fertility restrictions and a worldwide pandemic couldn't solve the problem, according to new research. There are currently more than seven billion people on Earth. And despite the United Nation's (UN) belief that humanity would level off, so to speak, a report published just last month shows that the 21st century may get a lot more crowded than previously thought....
  • As Great Barrier Reef Ails, Australia Scrambles To Save It

    National Public Radio: Steve Dorsey
    28 Oct 2014 | 11:55 am
    National Public Radio: The Great Barrier Reef has long been in trouble. One Australian government report in 2012 estimated the reef had lost more than half its coral since 1985. Now it's in such bad shape that the United Nations has warned it could list the World Heritage site as "in danger" next year. The Australian government is considering a new 35-year plan to rescue the reef. Nearly 2 million tourists travel to the reef each year. Many of them scuba dive to explore this expansive water world up close. It's what...
  • Melting Cave Ice Is Taking Ancient Climate Data with It

    Scientific American: Lucas Laursen
    28 Oct 2014 | 11:15 am
    Scientific American: On a recent visit to Crystal Ice Cave in Idaho, climate and cave researchers had to wade through frigid, knee-deep water to reach the ice formations that give the cave its name. Cavers are good-humored about the hardships of underground exploration, but this water was chilling for more than one reason: it was carrying away some of the very clues they had come to study. Ice is an invaluable source of information about the earth's past. Pollen trapped in ice from polar ice caps and mountaintop glaciers...
  • Artists, musicians, writers protest government plans for massive coal plant in the Sundarbans

    Washington Post: Juliet Eilperin
    28 Oct 2014 | 8:02 am
    Mongabay: Over the weekend, Bangladeshi artists performed plays, sang songs, and recited poetry all in a bid to protect the Sundarbans-the world's biggest mangrove forest-from the threat of a massive coal plant. Construction is already under way on the hugely controversial Rampal coal plant, a 1,320 megawatt plant set just 14 kilometers from the edge of the Sundarbans. "We have many alternatives to produce electricity but no alternative to Sundarbans," said Anu Muhammad at the cultural protest. A renowned...
  • With storms intensifying, Milwaukee braces for bigger floods

    Daily Climate: Brian Bienkowski
    28 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Daily Climate: Back when Pabst Blue Ribbon was for working folks -- not hipsters -- the brewery was a Milwaukee icon, bustling along the western edge of the city's central business district. Hitting hard times, Pabst left town a couple decades ago. But now the site infamous for cheap lager has permeable roads, abundant gardens and an underground tunnel to catch excess rainwater. It has re-emerged a symbol of how Milwaukee is greening to keep pace with a changing climate. The site's developer, Joseph J....
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    Water News -- ScienceDaily

  • Reef-builders with a sense of harmony

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. Scientists have made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.
  • Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:37 pm
    Bigger is better, if you're a leatherback sea turtle. For the first time, researchers have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
  • Ammonium source in open ocean tracked by researchers

    29 Oct 2014 | 11:56 am
    To understand the extent to which human activities are polluting Earth's atmosphere and oceans, it's important to distinguish human-made pollutants from compounds that occur naturally. A new study finds that deposition of ammonium, a source of nitrogen pollution, over the open ocean comes mostly from natural marine sources, and not from human activity.
  • Upgrading infrastructure could reduce flood damage

    29 Oct 2014 | 6:54 am
    The severe flooding that devastated a wide swath of Colorado last year might have been less destructive if the bridges, roads and other infrastructure had been upgraded or modernized, according to a new study.
  • The secret life of the sea trout

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:36 am
    Sea trout, also known as brown trout, live complicated lives. Like salmon, they begin their lives in a river, hatched from eggs that were laid in small nests, called redds. As the young fish mature, they go through several developmental stages, all of which involve substantial physiological changes. The most important stage from this perspective is when the fish becomes a smolt, after about 2 years. Entering the smolt stage is like being given a passport out to the sea, because the physiological changes allow the fish to tolerate salt water.
 
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    WaterSISWEB | Published News

  • Political Dimensions of Iran’s Water Crisis

    misspersian
    28 Oct 2014 | 11:48 am
    This is a political crisis, not only because Iran’s shrinking water resources have given rise to protests, but also because Iran’s nationalistic pursuit of development has itself been a primary driver of the water crisis. Iran’s post-revolutionary economic development policies have been formed in international isolation, removed from the global market, knowledge pool, and technological advances. Iran’s revolutionary mantle of ‘Neither West nor East’ has led successive governments to frame economic policies in the context of independence from global political and economic…
  • Challenges and Opportunities in Water Cycle Research: WCRP Contributions

    Sina
    27 Oct 2014 | 5:20 am
    The state of knowledge and outstanding challenges and opportunities in global water cycle observations, research and modeling are briefly reviewed to set the stage for the reasons behind the new thrusts promoted by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) as Grand Challenges to be addressed on a 5- to 10-year time frame. Those focused on water are led by the GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Exchanges) project. A number of GEWEX science questions are being brought forward within GEWEX and the WCRP under guidance of the Joint Scientific Committee. Here, we describe what are some imperatives…
  • A guide to good practice in modeling semantics for authors and referees

    Sina
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:42 am
    This opinion piece makes some suggestions about guidelines for modeling semantics that can be referred to by authors and referees. We discuss descriptions of model structures, different forms of simulation and prediction, descriptions of different sources of uncertainty in modeling practice, the language of model validation, and concepts of predictability and fitness-for-purpose. While not expecting universal agreement on these suggestions, given the loose usage of words in the literature, we hope that the discussion of the issues involved will at least give pause for thought and encourage…
  • What Is Groundwater?

    macy
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:29 pm
    This lighthearted animation tells the story of groundwater: where it is, where it comes from, and where it goes.
  • ‘Anonymous’ warning over Irish Water

    macy
    15 Oct 2014 | 5:19 pm
    Short video posted to YouTube accuses Government over introduction of water charges. A video purporting to be by online hacking collective Anonymous has accused the Government of stealing and using threats in order to force the introduction of water charges. The 2-minute video titled ‘#Anonymous message to the Republic of Ireland - Truth behind Irish Water charges’ is addressed the “citizens of the Republic of Ireland” and was posted on YouTube
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    Water Use It Wisely » News & Events

  • Outdoor Water Use – Fall Checkup

    parkandco
    28 Oct 2014 | 5:16 pm
    Fall is here! And it’s a great time to conduct an outdoor water use checkup, which could help you save water and money. Here are some tips to help you get started: Watering As temperatures begin to drop, you’ll need to water your landscaping less frequently. Make sure you water thoroughly and deeply at each watering. This way, roots are encouraged to grow deep into the soil where they’ll be better protected during the cold winter months. The 1-2-3 rule is an easy way to remember how deep to water: 1 foot – Ground-cover plants, cactuses and annuals 2 feet – Shrubs 3 feet – Trees…
  • Fall Planting – Wildflowers and More!

    parkandco
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Fall is a fantastic time to plant because soil temperatures are still warm, encouraging root growth and development while allowing plants to get better established before next summer’s heat sets in. Also, with cooler temperatures, plants need less water and it is a much more forgiving time of year to put new plants in the ground. It’s also the time of year to plant wildflower seeds for spring bloom, and the perfect time to plant a fall/winter vegetable garden or winter grass. So, get outside and Plant Something! Check out our list of resources below. Landscape Plants If you’re thinking…
  • Create a Water-Wise Herb Container Garden

    parkandco
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:46 pm
    Do you enjoy using fresh herbs when you cook? If so, you probably know how expensive they can be. What if fresh herbs were as close as your garden? Herbs are easy to grow and aren’t fussy. You may be surprised to find that herbs make great container plants and are a great alternative to flowering annuals. So, why should you replace your flowering annuals with herbs? Herbs need less water and fertilizer than flowers and are more resistant to insect pests. Their varying leaf colors and shapes aren’t just edible, they are beautiful too! Herbs can handle the extremes of winter and summer…
  • Get Your Irrigation System in Order for Fall

    parkandco
    8 Oct 2014 | 3:54 pm
    The cool season brings with it the renewal of the mind and body—gone are the long, hot summer days, at least for the foreseeable future. So what better time to get out into your yard and examine the state of your irrigation system? As Water Conservation Specialists, we often see overwatering of the landscape in the fall months.  Plants simply do not need as much water in the fall/winter as they do in the summer! Saving Water = Saving Money We all know that using less water means we will save money, but there’s an added bonus to not overwatering your yard in the cooler weather.  By…
  • Salinity Rebate Program – First of its Kind in Arizona

    parkandco
    2 Oct 2014 | 1:26 pm
    Why Salt is a Problem Increased salinity in water supplies in Arizona, and specifically Maricopa County, is an issue of growing concern. As people try to combat the natural water hardness of Arizona water supplies using conventional water softeners, increased discharge levels of salt are introduced into sewers, treatment plants and, at times, into groundwater aquifers through recharge. The increased salinity negatively impacts the environment and adds significant costs to our treatment processes. The predominant residential method of combating hard water is water softening through ion…
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    AWRA Water Blog

  • TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 18 – 24 October 2014

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:34 am
    I love this photo, Tweeted by zenrainman, with the ominous caption, ‘Peering into the future?’ We’ll see. New category this week – ‘Featured Five’ – just five Tweets that piqued my curiosity or were otherwise noteworthy/bizarre. Featured Five #cawater Bond! New @PacificInstitut Report Provides Insights on California’s Proposition 1 http://bit.ly/1z1jx69  From @Alliance4Water: Great Pub: ‘Beyond Downscaling’ Available as PDF & Apple iBook. http://bit.ly/1zova8q  […] Related posts: TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 27…
  • TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 11 – 17 October 2014

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:52 pm
    I will be heading to Vancouver, BC, tomorrow for the Geological Society of America’s 2014Annual Meeting. I’ll be returning on Wednesday, 22 October. You can download the program and other information here. Dr. Peter Wampler (Oregon State MS & PhD) of Grand Valley State University, Dr. Peter Knappett (University of Waterloo and University of Tennessee) of Texas A&M and I will be convening an oral Topical Session (T116) titled, Water Contamination and […] Related posts: TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 4 – 10 October 2014 Great news about the…
  • Déjà Vu All Over Again: Mississippi v. Memphis Over Groundwater Pumping

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    14 Oct 2014 | 1:46 pm
    ‘It’s like déjà vu all over again.’ That’s what the renowned English scholar Yogi Berra might say had he read the following story in the 6 October 2014 edition of the Jackson (MS) Clarion-Ledger:   Is Memphis Stealing Water from Mississippi? Mississippi officials are renewing allegations that Memphis is stealing water from the state. The U.S. Supreme […] Related posts: Book Review: ‘Mississippi River Tragedies’ Cutting to the chase: Read the book! Well-written and researched... Texas Water Resources Institute’s TxH2O Makes Texas Groundwater…
  • TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 4 – 10 October 2014

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    10 Oct 2014 | 11:38 am
    Great news about the Nobel Peace Prize – nothing like good news on a Friday! It was awarded to (from The Verge): Kailash Satyarthi and 17-year-old Malala Yousafzay have won this year’s Nobel Peace Prize “for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.” The Norwegian Nobel […] Related posts: TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 27 September – 3 October 2014 This week’s featured visual is Ogallala Water, a bottled water... TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 9 – 15 August 2014…
  • TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 27 September – 3 October 2014

    Michael "Aquadoc" Campana
    3 Oct 2014 | 12:56 pm
    This week’s featured visual is Ogallala Water, a bottled water from the mind of Gayle Leonard. The business model is unusual: with each passing year, the amount of water in the bottle declines. It’s already hitting the shelves with 30% less! Wait’ll 2030! I bet it goes well with Circle of Blue journalist Brett Walton’s last pie of the summer, a […] Related posts: TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 13 -19 September 2014 It turned out it was premature to display St. Andrew’s Cross (flag... TGIF! Weekly Water News Summary, 30 August – 5 September…
 
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    We All Live Downstream

  • Halloween costumes scary in more ways than one

    admin
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:52 am
    By Amanda Sebert, Consultant and Deema Dabbagh, Environmental Health Intern, Massachusetts The chemicals in these costumes are what’s scary… This Halloween, we learned we have been scared for the wrong reasons. Our fears of ghouls and goblins are (probably) fictitious, but our newfound concerns that our costumes and decorations are dangerous threats to our health are only too real. A recent study conducted by HealthyStuff.org and released in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Minnesota by Clean Water Action and our coalitions partners, found elevated levels of toxic chemicals in…
  • Why I’m Blown Away by Danish Wind Energy

    admin
    29 Oct 2014 | 4:27 pm
    Lily Biggar; Former Communications Intern [Ed. Note - though we were sad to see Lily go, we're lucky enough to have her dispatches from Copenhagen] A month ago, after completing my summer internship with Clean Water Action, I wrote to say that I’d be spending the fall semester studying sustainability in Copenhagen, Denmark. Most of the buzz surrounding Danish sustainability stems from the country’s leadership in wind energy. Wind currently accounts for nearly 20% of the nation’s electricity consumption— that’s four times that of the United States! Denmark has recently set the goal…
  • 739,794

    admin
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:27 pm
    By Phil Dimotsis, Campaign Organizer – Follow Phil on Twitter (@PhiluptuousD) 739,794 comments…and counting! Today was historic. Today we showcased nearly 750,000 public comments (that’s three quarters of a million, and counting) from people like you to EPA Water’s Deputy Assistant Director, Ken Kopocis, staff from US Army Corp of Engineers, and to Maryland’s US Senator Ben Cardin. We showed them the broad public support for EPA’s proposal to protect the nation’s streams and wetlands. They were enthralled. Kopocis said at one point, “Clean water…
  • Protect Clean Water – Kids Get It

    admin
    19 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    By Susan Eastwood, Campaign Organizer – follow Susan on Twitter (@SCEastwood) Emil, age 8, said it best. “Don’t throw trash on the ground because when it rains, it washes into the river and dirties the drinking water.” Five year old Archie drew a contrast in bright colors, to compare “a happy fish swimming by a rainbow waterfall” with “a fish throwing up. It’s what’s gonna happen if people keep putting garbage in the water.” Avery, age 8, showed two children holding their noses next to a polluted stream with a very sad fish swimming among the mess. When you look at…
  • Happy Birthday to the Clean Water Act

    jscott@cleanwater.org
    18 Oct 2014 | 11:59 am
    by Bob Wendelgass, Clean Water Action President & CEO, follow on Twitter @BWendelgass The Clean Water Act turns forty-two this weekend! When Congress overwhelmingly passed the landmark Clean Water Act in 1972, we set an incredibly ambitious goal: eliminate all water pollution. Before the Act, the Cuyahoga River caught fire, Lake Erie was declared “dead,” untreated waste was routinely dumped in rivers and streams, and wetlands were thought to be useless swamps that needed to be drained for development or agriculture. The Clean Water Act changed all of that. Over the past…
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    Akvo.org » Blog

  • Dear UN: we’re all a part of the data revolution. #akvo

    Stefan Kraus
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:56 am
    In August, the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon established an “Independent Expert Advisory Group” to provide advice on a “data revolution for sustainable development”, as part of the post-2015 development agenda process. Post-2015 is United Nations-speak for “What comes after the Millennium Development Goals?” aka the MDGs; this set of 15-year global targets related to poverty reduction and international development. They run out in 2015, so what comes next occupies much debate around the UN and the organisations that work to influence it.The…
  • Open data and the aid boom in the Pacific: Part II

    Amitangshu Acharya
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:40 am
    Above: A field visit to Mele, Vanuatu. October 2014. Photo credit: Lissy van Noort.In part I of this series, I outlined the first steps in our collaboration with UNICEF and the Department of Mines, Geology and Water Resources (DGMWR) to introduce mobile-based data and asset management tools to Vanuatu as part of developing its national water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) database. Generally, this shift from “data free” to “real time” data would have been worth celebrating. But scarcely had we put down our beer bottles, than we had started planning for the next phase.
  • Open data and the aid boom in the Pacific: Part I

    Amitangshu Acharya
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:12 am
    Above: Port Vila Market, a bustling sight in the capital of Vanuatu. Port Vila, Vanuatu. October 2014. Photo credit: Lissy van Noort.The Republic of Vanuatu is as old as I am. Both of us were born in the 80s, and are stepping into our early thirties together. When a country is this young, the mortar used to build structures of governance is so fresh, you can almost smell it.In this Rorschach ink dot of an island nation, UNICEF Pacific collaborated with us to bring Akvo FLOW to the Ministry of Land and Natural Resources (MLNR) and specifically to the Department of Geology, Mines and Water…
  • WWF-Indonesia

    Emily Armanetti
    15 Oct 2014 | 1:25 am
    Above: A sea turtle passes by the hero shoot on her way back to sea after laying nearly 100 eggs at a nearby nesting site. From left: Hendri and Andi Priansyah of POKMASWAS Kambau Borneo; Yanto Aldiani Anong and Agri Aditya Fisesa of WWF-Indonesia. Paloh, Indonesia, August 2014. Photo credit: Des SyafrizalWho?Conservation organisation WWF (World Wildlife Fund For Nature) works in 100 countries around the world to protect the future of nature. WWF-Indonesia is running a number of conservation programmes across Indonesia and has long been handling the monitoring on the ground for various…
  • DORP explains how to get the most out of Akvo RSR

    Laura Roverts
    10 Oct 2014 | 12:45 am
    A couple of days ago, Zobair Hasan and his colleagues from DORP published a blog sharing their positive experience using Akvo RSR.Above: Jafor Ekbal giving instructions on how to prepare a social map, in Bhuapur, Bangladesh. Photo by DORP.DORP is a Bangladesh partner of the Dutch WASH alliance and it has been using Akvo RSR since 2012 to provide updates to its projects online. However, DORP recently received equipment (smartphones) that lets people update their activities more regularly. Following a recent training course on using Akvo RSR with the new devices, the project…
 
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    Aguanomics

  • Economists are not the only ones...

    30 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
  • Speed blogging

    30 Oct 2014 | 4:30 am
    Mangroves store carbon, protect juvenile fish and diffuse flood damages. Too bad corrupt governments ignore those public benefits for cronies' shrimp farms. Related: How to use nature (swamps, etc.) to absorb higher water flows due to climate changeAmericans in the West use far more water... because lawns. Remember that when you drink dustAnother parallel between California and India: Rich farmers can drill deeper wells than poor households [Indian version from 2009]Market failure: water prices in Chile do not reflect [enough] scarcity because the value of water (its market price) is too low…
  • Bleg: How can I get started in environmental sustainability?

    29 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
    J, a former student, asks: I'm living in Toronto and I'd like to work as a consultant on environmental sustainability. I majored in economics and minored in Geography, but I seem to lack the knowledge that people get from environmental engineering. Can you give me some advice on skills to learn (more education? professional certificate)?
  • The Armchair Economist -- the review

    29 Oct 2014 | 4:30 am
    I assigned Steven Landsburg's book to students in my Principles of Economics class (their first economics class) because I wanted them to read a "popsci" book that would help them see "the economics of everyday life" (the book's subtitle). I'm glad I did, but I had to make a few corrections of Landsburg's perspectives in class. I don't think that's a problem -- economics is not always a "science" -- but it's worth remembering that some of his assumptions and/or logic may not survive scrutiny. That's probably no great shock to Landsburg, who's presenting an "armchair view" of numerous complex…
  • I'm teaching common pool resource challenges!

    28 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
    The class will take more than a few minutes, but it's good to notice when we succeed: Wikipedia, along with open-source software and other free collaborative projects, are examples of “commons-based peer produc­tions... in which the central characteristics are groups of in­dividuals that successfully collaborate on large-scale projects following a diverse cluster of motivational drives and social signals, rather than either market prices or managerial commands.” These motivations include the psychological reward of interacting with others and the personal gratification of doing a useful…
 
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    Washlink

  • TED Talk: Francis de los Reyes: Sanitation is a basic human right

    WASHLink
    25 Oct 2014 | 8:57 am
    Dr. Francis L. de los Reyes III is a Professor of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Associate Faculty of Microbiology, and Training Faculty of Biotechnology at North Carolina State University. His research focuses on biological processes and combines modeling, bioreactor experiments, and molecular microbial ecology tools in addressing fundamental and practical issues in environmental biotechnology and environmental engineering. An important area of his research and teaching is water and sanitation in developing countries. Current and past research projects (funding of ~ $4.5…
  • edX: Introduction to Drinking Water Treatment – OCT 28

    WASHLink
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:24 pm
    Learn about urban water services, focusing on conventional technologies for drinking water treatment. About this Course This course focuses on conventional technologies for drinking water treatment. Unit processes, involved in the treatment chain, are discussed as well as the physical, chemical and biological processes involved. The emphasis is on the effect of treatment on water quality and the dimensions of the  unit processes in the treatment chain.  After the course one should be able to recognise the process units, describe their function, and make basic calculations for a preliminary…
  • Webinar – Disability: Making CLTS Fully Inclusive

    WASHLink
    16 Oct 2014 | 7:22 pm
    “press release” On Thursday 30th October, 10-11.30am (GMT), the CLTS Knowledge Hub together with Hazel Jones (WEDC) and Jane Wilbur (WaterAid) will be hosting a webinar on the theme of the recently published Frontiers issue 3:Disability-Making CLTS fully inclusive. About the webinar CLTS aims at total sanitation. For that it has to be inclusive. There are ethical reasons for this, but the bottom line is that while any open defecation continues, all are affected. This webinar will focus on people with disabilities and their particular needs for access to sanitation. People affected…
  • E4C Webinar | WASH in Emergencies: Lessons Learned and Way Forward October 28

    WASHLink
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:41 pm
    press release Presented by Daniele Lantagne, Usen Family Career Development Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Tufts University Moderated by Sean Furey, Water & Sanitation Specialist, Skat Foundation October 28, 2014 | 11:00 AM EDT (convert to your time) Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are critical needs for populations affected by emergencies such as natural disasters, outbreaks, and violence.  In this webinar, we will learn about commonly implemented emergency response interventions to treat drinking water and find out about their successes, failures, and…
  • 3rd Annual Virtual Menstrual Hygiene Mgmnt in WASH in Schools Conference

    WASHLink
    1 Oct 2014 | 11:22 pm
     Sponsors: Columbia University and UNICEF October 29th 2014 Background: The 3rd annual virtual MHM conference will provide an opportunity to share lessons learned with the WASH in Schools (WinS) community around the world with a particular focus on MHM programming in WinS in various contexts. The conference will also enable the global WinS community to gather documentation for a basic package of MHM in WinS interventions. The conference will provide an opportunity to: (1)Share school based MHM program descriptions (2) Share findings on MHM program scale and impact and (3) Share…
 
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    Chance of Rain

  • Proposition 1 analyzed for voters

    EmilyGreen
    23 Oct 2014 | 8:23 pm
    A Pacific Institute report shows Proposition 1, California's 2014 water bond, weak on conservation
  • Fourth year in the garden

    EmilyGreen
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:49 pm
    The third in a series of photo essays on the progress and setbacks faced in taking over the remnant of an old California orchard.
  • Starve the lawn, not the tree

    EmilyGreen
    1 Oct 2014 | 8:36 pm
    Well-intentioned reductions in lawn irrigation to conserve water can have catastrophic consequences for LA's urban canopy. The Urban Forestry Council and Barbara Eisenstein have the 411 for progressive tree care.
  • Joke shaming water wasters works

    EmilyGreen
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:39 pm
    The EPA veto of Colorado's massive Two Forks Dam ended the era of big infrastructure and forced Denver to take the lead in urban water conservation.
  • Bracing for scarcity

    EmilyGreen
    7 Jul 2014 | 1:39 pm
    L.A. Natural History Museum's "Just Add Water" series looks at the need for landscape reform in California. Hosted by UCLA's Jon Christensen, panelists include native plant expert Carol Bornstein, landscape designer Pamela Berstler and environment reporter Emily Green
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    Water Canada

  • VIDEO: Better Water Testing, Thanks to Breath-Freshening Strips

    admin
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:29 pm
    A group of McMaster researchers has solved the problem of cumbersome, expensive and painfully slow water-testing by turning the process upside-down. For more on this “lab in a pill,” see Water Canada’s November/December 2014 issue.The post VIDEO: Better Water Testing, Thanks to Breath-Freshening Strips appeared first on Water Canada.
  • New Sanitation

    admin
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:23 pm
    Treatment of domestic wastewater to remove organic and inorganic pollutants is expensive. In a traditional wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), energy is put into the system at a significant cost in order to remove organics and nutrients. With increasing awareness of the presence of emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and hormones, wastewater treatment […]The post New Sanitation appeared first on Water Canada.
  • Interview: Warren Wishart on Integrated Risk Management

    admin
    27 Oct 2014 | 11:28 am
    Urban growth, climate change, and aging infrastructure are among the many challenges faced by municipalities in their efforts to effectively manage their stormwater, wastewater, and drinking water systems. Integrated Risk Management Framework for Municipal Water Systems is a project funded by the Canadian Water Network (CWN) and led by Edward McBean, professor and Canada Research […]The post Interview: Warren Wishart on Integrated Risk Management appeared first on Water Canada.
  • February 25-26, 2015: International Conference on Water Management Modeling

    admin
    27 Oct 2014 | 11:14 am
    Where: Toronto, ON Organization: CHI Website: http://www.chiwater.com/Training/Conferences/conferencetoronto.aspThe post February 25-26, 2015: International Conference on Water Management Modeling appeared first on Water Canada.
  • IDE Technologies Partners with Fair Canada Engineering

    admin
    27 Oct 2014 | 10:49 am
    IDE Technologies announced on October 27 a new partnership with Fair Canada Engineering which will see the company’s water treatment presence in Alberta’s oilsands increase. “The oilsands market in Alberta has significant potential for growth,” said CEO Avshalom Felber. “With the support of Fair Canada Engineering in Calgary, we look forward to expanding our presence […]The post IDE Technologies Partners with Fair Canada Engineering appeared first on Water Canada.
 
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    Waiology

  • Landscapes shaped by water

    Waiology
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    By Daniel Collins New Zealand is both a pluvial and fluvial country. A lot of water falls on, moves through, and runs off the landscape to the surrounding seas. At each step along the way water can play a role in shaping the landscape, whether by resisting or facilitating erosion or by providing environments where eroded sediment is deposited. The resulting landscape becomes a collage of many different erosional and depositional fingerprints. Here’s how they work. Erosion by water begins as soon as raindrops hit the earth. The impact of innumerable droplets on exposed soil will tend to…
  • Southern Alps groundwater sheds light on the Alpine Fault

    Waiology
    27 Oct 2014 | 12:00 pm
    By Simon Cox During the spring months of 2014, international attention will be drawn to the Alpine Fault along the western side of the Southern Alps, as the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) enters its second phase. Scientists from around the world aim to complete a 1.5 km drill hole near Whataroa, recover fault rocks for testing, and install a downhole laboratory that can measure fluid temperature and pressure, stress and listen for tiny earthquakes within the fault at depth. The first phase (DFDP-1) was completed in February 2011 with the successful construction of two shallow boreholes…
  • Thirsty trees and water yields: Vegetation, water and a changing climate

    Waiology
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:00 pm
    By Cate Macinnis-Ng Future climate projections predict that some parts of New Zealand will become drier with droughts being more severe and frequent. This is particularly true for the north and eastern parts of the country. We know that soil moisture availability will decline due to reductions in rainfall and increased evaporative demand will lead to faster transfer of water back to the atmosphere. However, we do not yet fully understand the impact of climate change on water balances of vegetated catchments. In forested areas, a large proportion of rainfall (up to 90% or more) is lost back to…
  • Tussocks – a fundamental component of New Zealand’s water cycle

    Waiology
    19 Oct 2014 | 4:18 pm
    By Alice Trevelyan, Sarah Mager and Peter Wilson The significance of fog deposition to increased water yield has been contested for many years, especially across the Otago region. Determining the importance of the role of tussock grasslands in the hydrological system is becoming increasingly important, especially over the summer periods when the demand for water for irrigation, recreation and domestic use is at its peak.  Retaining tussock headwaters for fog capture may protect rivers from potentially running dry in the lower reaches during summer. Protecting our waterways from the headwater…
  • A pluvial and fluvial country

    Waiology
    13 Oct 2014 | 1:44 pm
    By Daniel Collins As Sir Geoffrey Palmer once remarked, New Zealand is a pluvial[1] country. It rains a lot. On average, 2.3 metres of water falls across New Zealand each year, or 610,000 million m3 in volumetric terms (about 10 times the volume of Lake Taupo). This is more than most countries, but not all. Values vary from source to source, but according to FAO data[2] the wettest country is Sao Tome and Principe (3.2 m/year), the driest is Egypt (51 mm/year), and our trans-Tasman neighbours receive 534 mm/year. But these long-term, national averages hide a lot of variability. In recent…
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    Watery Foundation »

  • The cost of Florida water

    Tom
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:59 am
    A recent national report (p. 13) looked at monthly water bills in 27 American cities and concluded that Jacksonville was the cheapest in the group: A more detailed look at Florida water and wastewater rates found significant variation (p. 6) across five regions in the state: By way of comparison, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports (p. 2) the following average monthly household expenditures: Alcohol: $38 Entertainment: $217 Food away from home: $223 Gasoline: $230 In context, water doesn’t seem very expensive.
  • Real journalism?

    Tom
    26 Oct 2014 | 2:05 pm
    What I write on this blog often resembles journalism:     Unfortunately, newspaper journalism on environmental topics has suffered from recent declines in revenues and subscriptions. We are lucky that Florida still has as many informed and dedicated environmental reporters as it does. They understand, as the Pew Research Center project on journalism concluded, that “Journalism’s first obligation is to the truth.” That’s my goal here, too, but perhaps with an unusually direct approach to political power and the fundamental causes of water management…
  • The Charlie Crist-Rick Scott Debates and Harry Frankfurt

    Tom
    22 Oct 2014 | 4:55 am
    I watched the final Crist-Scott “debate” last night so you didn’t have to. For context, look first to a dispute in the final 2010 Alex Sink-Rick Scott debate. At one point, Sink burst out in frustration: “Well, my opponent has said that he would do away with the Department of Community Affairs.” Scott denied it, claiming that he wanted only to “go back to the original purpose of DCA.” True or not? The next day, Politifact Florida called Sink’s statement “False.” It turned out to be “false” only in the sense that Scott…
  • Water 4.0?

    Tom
    19 Oct 2014 | 11:02 am
    David L. Sedlak, Engineering Professor at Berkeley, Deputy Director of the Berkeley Water Center, and 2014 winner of the Clarke Prize for excellence in water research, has written a book about water issues: Water 4.0. He rejects the usual structure of this kind of book: About twenty years ago, when I started getting interested in these issues, I encountered a problem: the books on water intended for a general audience were too general, with large sections dedicated to disparate issues like wasteful agricultural water use, destruction of aquatic habitat, and the water and sanitation needs…
  • Florida water meanings

    Tom
    15 Oct 2014 | 2:12 pm
    One reason that thinking about water is so difficult is that it attracts so many interpretations and meanings. Two examples: We have to thank the Springs Eternal Project for a mesmerizing 12-minute video that is a “joyful, humorous and deeply affectionate underwater tour through some of the splendid flora and fauna of Florida’s marvelous springs”: SWIMMING THROUGH AIR from Lesley Gamble on Vimeo. A different perspective, but somehow related, is the history and marketing of “Florida Water.” This inexpensive cologne dates back to 1808, was used by both men and women,…
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    Dales Water Services Ltd

  • Acidisation of Boreholes

    Jonny
    28 Oct 2014 | 3:18 am
    From time to time boreholes that have been drilled into chalk aquifers need to be either developed to increase performance or rehabilitated due to blockage by incrustations. One technique used to achieve this is acidisation whereby hydrochloric acid is used in large quantities to facilitate the removal of soft material from within the borehole and to open fissures in the underlying chalk. This process is done to increase the flow rate of the borehole by allowing more water into the aquifer. How Acidisation Works CaCO3(s) + 2HCl(aq) → CaCl2(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g) By introducing an acidic into…
  • New Job Vacancy at Dales Water for an Admin Assistant

    Jonny
    18 Sep 2014 | 2:04 am
    Due to continued expansion we are looking to recruit either a full time or part time (dependant on the candidate and there availability) administration assistant, the initial appointment would be of 1 year duration with a view to this being permanent thereafter. Examples of the tasks involved are: Dealing with telephone calls, customer queries and providing excellent customer service Taking notes and memos for directors Carrying out mailing and banking activities Word processing, scanning and data base management Filing and organisation Carrying out bespoke requirements and jobs on behalf of…
  • Dales Water Borehole Helps Asparagus Grower Save on Mains Water Bills

    Jonny
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:45 am
    Dales Water Services were approached by a vegetable growing and washing farm based in North Lincolnshire that specialises in Asparagus and Shallots. Employing over 20 full time staff the operation is one of the largest asparagus producers in the UK and supplies to a range of supermarkets and grocers up and down the country. The farm uses state of the art equipment to streamline production during the busy harvest season but up until earlier this year were relying on mains water for the washing of crops prior to packaging. The owner contacted Dales Water in early 2014 to look at the possibility…
  • Benefits of Borehole Water Supplies for use on Pig Farms

    Jonny
    19 Jun 2014 | 2:45 am
    Water is important but it’s an expensive resource that is easily influenced by infrastructure and climate, often leaving the pig farmer with an expensive, inadequate supply that is restricted in times of good weather. Furthermore, we are all seeing our mains water bills go up with reports of mains water companies making substantial profits at the expense of end users. Couple this with water dependant livestock, wash down and general agricultural use the volumes of water used can significantly accelerate along with the water mains bill that accompanies it in a short space of time.
  • Melmerby Run Results and The Tour De Dales

    Jonny
    16 Jun 2014 | 2:39 am
    On May 25th 242 runners took to the streets of Melmerby to take part in the Melmerby 10K road race. As mentioned in an earlier blog post we were sponsoring the race and providing all the bottled water for runners and spectators. Joe Barnett, Dales Water – Melmerby 10k – 50:38.8 The race was a big success with runners from all over North Yorkshire taking part including Joe Barnett, one of our Engineers, who completed the race in 50:38.8. You can also see the race winners below: Category Winner Winning time Total racers Overall O’grady,Shaun 33:28.1 242 Female Barlow,Sharon…
 
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    Donna Vincent Roa

  • Roa Pens Communication Chapter for Water Anthology

    Donna Vincent Roa
    27 Oct 2014 | 12:30 am
    With more than 25 authors who are sharing ways to accelerate change around water, a new anthology called “Damned If We Don’t” aims to educate water professionals and inspire them to take action.  SACRAMENTO – Donna Vincent Roa, water sector communication expert and managing partner and CEO of Vincent Roa Group, has penned a chapter titled, […] The post Roa Pens Communication Chapter for Water Anthology appeared first on Donna Vincent Roa.
  • Value of Water Book to Debut Internationally at Frankfurt Book Fair

    Donna Vincent Roa
    8 Oct 2014 | 12:54 am
    WASHINGTON, October 8, 2014 — “The Value of Water: A Compendium of Essays by Smart CEOs,” available on Amazon, other online retailers, and the Value of Water book website, will debut internationally at the Frankfurt Book Fair October 8-12. The Frankfurt Book Fair is the world’s largest international fair for books and content. Last year, […] The post Value of Water Book to Debut Internationally at Frankfurt Book Fair appeared first on Donna Vincent Roa.
  • New Realities Needed for Water Sustainability

    Donna Vincent Roa
    1 Oct 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Water’s scarcity and abundance impact the availability and price of goods, the profit of companies, and the vitality of economies. Climate change realities coupled with urban growth, infrastructure demands, and economic constraints create additional pressures on cities, businesses, and water utilities. These circumstances highlight the need for increased awareness about the value of water and […] The post New Realities Needed for Water Sustainability appeared first on Donna Vincent Roa.
  • Effective Communication in the Water Industry

    Donna Vincent Roa
    3 Sep 2014 | 9:46 pm
    With permission from The Water Values Podcast Website… Listen Now Donna Vincent Roa, a communication specialist, water sector communication expert and Managing Partner at the Vincent Roa Group, comes on The Water Values Podcast for a discussion on the importance and effectiveness of communication using storytelling, visual and symbolic elements, and language to educate and […] The post Effective Communication in the Water Industry appeared first on Donna Vincent Roa.
  • Dogs, Christmas Trees and Yellow Rubber Chickens

    Donna Vincent Roa
    23 Aug 2014 | 4:23 am
    I normally write about water issues. But, today I thought I would go off topic just a wee bit. In the past few weeks, I’ve had several conversations with my clients about how and why every organization should facilitate a photo session for its leadership to take professional headshots. I was asked to provide guidance […] The post Dogs, Christmas Trees and Yellow Rubber Chickens appeared first on Donna Vincent Roa.
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